Want to Skip a GMAT Question?

Updated: Aug 26, 2019

Hi boys and girls, this one’s not gonna be verbose, for those of you who have no problem with timing on the test, you can skip this entry, for those who do, here’s a handy flow chart:





As you can see, when spending time on a question, the more time you spend, the more confident you need to be to justify spending more time on it. Otherwise you’re just wasting time.



It’s worth noting that the grey blocks above are showing you the timeline within a question, and though I’m using the quant timing of 2mins per question, with some allowance to go to 3mins, this timing is designed to be indicative only, don’t constantly look at the clock while doing questions, you’ll slowly go mad.


Caveats:

this is a time management framework, if during your practice, you have tons of extra time, don’t bother using this.


Caveat on the caveat:

even if you’re moving at fast speeds in prep, it’s worth noting that on the day of the real test, most people will suffer performance anxiety to one degree or another, and the average student might slow down 5-10% due to this, so if you’re tight against the time limit, you still need to be using this.

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